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UNIX/LINUX Command – unshar

NAME

unshar—Unpack a shar file

SYNOPSIS

unshar [ -d directory ] [ -c ][-e | -E exit_line ] [ file … ]

DESCRIPTION

unshar scans mail messages looking for the start of a shell archive. It then passes the archive through a copy of the shell to unpack it. It will accept multiple files. If no files are given, standard input is used. This manual page reflects unshar version 4.0.

OPTIONS

Options have a one-letter version starting with – or a long version starting with –. The exceptions are –help and –version, which don’t have a short version.

Options Description
–version Print the version number of the program on standard output, then immediately exit.
–help Print a help summary on standard output, then immediately exit.
-d DIRECTORY Change directory to DIRECTORY
–directory=DIRECTORY before unpacking any files.
-c –overwrite Passed as an option to the shar file. Many shell archive scripts (including those produced by shar 3.40 and newer) accept a -c argument to indicate that existing files should be overwritten.
-e –exit-0 This option exists mainly for people who collect many shell archives into a single mail folder. With this option, unshar isolates each different shell archive from the others that have been put in the same file, unpacking each in turn, from the beginning of the file towards its end. Its proper operation relies on the fact that many shar files are terminated by an exit 0 at the beginning of a line.
Option -e is internally equivalent to -E “exit 0”.
-E STRING –split-at=STRING This option works like -e, but it allows you to specify the string that separates archives if exit 0 isn’t appropriate. For example, noticing that most .signatures have a –on a line right before them, one can sometimes use — split-at=– for splitting shell archives that lack the exit 0 line at end. The signature will then be skipped altogether with the headers of the following message.

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